lifting shackles

Chain Style Shackle

lifting shackles

Anchor Style Shackle

When determining the best shackle for your lifting application, there are many options to choose from. Shackles are typically available in two styles: chain style and anchor style.

Chain shackles are best-suited for straight line, single connection pulls because of their U-shape. Anchor or bow shackles have a more generous loop. This allows them to be side loaded or used for multiple connections.

Whether you use chain or anchor shackles, there are three types of pins that are used to secure a shackle, each with their own benefits and limitations.

lifting shackles

Screw pin shackle

lifting shackles

Bolt, nut and cotter shackle

lifting shackles

Round pin shackle

 

 

Screw Pin Lifting Shackles

Screw Pin Shackles allow for quick and easy removal of the screw pin, which makes this style ideal for applications where the shackle is removed frequently. While the threaded pin can resist axial forces, it should not be cyclically loaded. Additionally, it is unreliable and vulnerable to backing out in applications where the pin is subjected to a torque or twisting action. In some applications, it is recommended to “mouse” the screw pin to prevent it from unscrewing. This type of shackle is suitable for overhead lifting.

Bolt, Nut & Cotter Lifting Shackles

Of all shackle types, bolt, nut, and cotter shackles provide the most secure pin arrangement, resisting axial and torsional loading. This type of shackle should be used in semi-permanent applications where the pin is removed infrequently. Bolt, nut, and cotter shackles are suitable for overhead lifting.

Round Pin Lifting Shackles

Round Pin Shackles allow for easy removal by simply removing the cotter that holds the pin in place. These shackles perform well where the pin is subjected to a torque or twisting action. They are not recommended for use where the pin is subject to an axial load. Round pin shackles are not suitable for overhead lifting.

For more information on shackles, check out our safety webinar on the Proper Use of Shackles or our other blog articles on shackles.

{ 0 comments }

What is a Ramshorn Hook?

0 comments

by  on September 8, 2016

ramshorn hooks

Photo courtesy of @cranenation via Instagram

A Ramshorn hook is a shank hook with two throat openings, sometimes called sister hooks, double hooks or twin hooks. They are used in applications with shipyard cranes and container cranes. Ramshorn hooks can be used on any type of crane block.

Why Use a Ramshorn (Double) Hook?

Ramshorn hooks offer many benefits to the user. Not only do they allow for better rigging options due to the wider profile and double throat combination, they also provide better load distribution when using multiple slings in a rigging application.

Featuring an additional throat opening, Ramshorn hooks prevent slings from bunching up as they more frequently do with single hooks. This second throat also helps to prevent sling damage when under load. Featuring a wider hook profile, as compared to single hooks, Ramshorn hooks allow for more stable load control when properly rigged. The wider profile also provides better load distribution and allows for more controlled lifts.

Compared to single hooks, Ramshorn hooks commonly have a smaller frame with a much higher capacity, helping to reduce the weight of the overall crane lifting gear.

Not all Ramshorn Hooks Are Created Equal.

Ramshorn Hooks

There are two types of Ramshorn hooks: the Ramshorn Form A hook, which has a solid lower hook design, and the Ramshorn Form B hook. Columbus McKinnon offers the Form B version because of its versatility. This hook provides all the advantages as mentioned above with the addition of a hole in the lower hook to attach rigging hardware. This feature gives the user the option to change their double hook into a sling hook if so desired.

All Ramshorn hooks are manufactured to DIN 15402 standards. Just like our single hooks, these double hooks can be furnished in various configurations including unmachined, machined, and machined with nuts for full suspensions.

In 2015, Columbus McKinnon acquired Stahlhammer Bommern GmbH (STB), the leading manufacturer of heavy-load single and ramshorn hooks in Europe. Now available in North America, our offering includes a comprehensive line of CM Heavy-Duty Crane Hooks in both single- and double-hook configurations.

Download our Heavy Duty Crane Hook brochure.

{ 0 comments }

load securementIn many cases, the importance of tying down a load on or in a truck is underestimated. It’s interesting to talk to trucking people and find out that they are very in tune with what is expected of them with regards to the vehicle they drive and the maintenance of that vehicle. But when it comes to tie downs and load securement, they usually fall short.

Securing loads in and on trucks is very important – not just to the driver, but to their customer and most importantly the general public.

Good tie downs go a long way to ensure cargo being hauled on a truck stays on the truck.

A pre-use inspection of the tie downs must be done to ensure the working load limit (WLL) of that tie down is intact. All tie downs have markings to indicate what grade they are or they will be marked with a working load limit. The higher the grade, the stronger the product – as you typically see with chain. Grade 30 is the lowest grade and is not as strong as say, grade 70 or grade 80.

During a roadside inspection by law enforcement, they will look for these markings. If they cannot find any, they will automatically rate the tie down as grade 30, the lowest option. This derating may cause him/her to take you and your vehicle out of service due to lack of adequate tie downs. Therefore, it may be helpful to conduct a pre-use inspection, per the manufacturer’s specifications, to ensure the proper type and number of chain tie downs is used.

Straps need attention too.

The condition of synthetic straps is one of the most overlooked load securement items. When straps are purchased, the manufacturer assigns a working load limit. That WLL is for straps that are intact and undamaged. This is where a pre-use inspection is needed. Straps that have damage in excess of the manufacturer’s specifications must be removed from service.

Take time to check your load securement equipment.

All too often we are in a hurry to get from one place to another. This is usually when we take chances and cut corners. This is also the time that an accident is most likely to happen. It is important to take extra time to make sure the equipment you want to use is in good condition and meets the requirements for use as a load securement device.

Want to learn more? View our Safety Webinar on “Selecting & Using Tie Downs & Binders.”

{ 0 comments }

How Crane Collision Avoidance Systems Help Prevent Accidents & Reduce Maintenance Costs

July 14, 2016






I sat down with subject matter expert and Magnetek controls product manager, Casey Cummins, to discuss the benefits and features of crane collision avoidance systems. Q: What is a crane collision avoidance system? Casey: Collision avoidance systems are electronic devices that can be installed on your crane to help prevent accidents before they happen, protecting people, […]

Read the full article →

Summer Concert Series: Where is your CM Hoist?

June 30, 2016






Who doesn’t love the summer time and seeing a great concert with your favorite band from the past or present? A few of our fans recently shared CM Hoist photos from summer concerts they’ve attended, which included a snapshot of our #CMLodestar motors. Like us, they love seeing CM Hoist products in action! We know that […]

Read the full article →

Yale Lifting Solutions Provides 200-Ton Test Rig for Hook Proof Load Testing

June 9, 2016






Yale Lifting Solutions was recently approached by a long-time client in the South African gold mining industry to provide a 200-ton capacity horizontal test rig used to proof load test humble hooks. Humble hooks are safety devices used to connect winder ropes to the main personnel cages and ore conveyances on hoists in vertical mine […]

Read the full article →

Is Changing a Hoist Brake Considered a Modification?

May 12, 2016






Rod, a Canadian crane services manager and recent safety webinar attendee, asked: “Is changing a hoist brake a modification? Tom Reardon, Columbus McKinnon training instructor, responds: Changing a hoist holding brake is not a modification simply because the brake is being replaced. Merriam Webster Dictionary defines modification as: “a change in something (such as a system or style).” […]

Read the full article →

Can Spring Balancers Save Lives? Yes They Can!

May 5, 2016






Normally, spring balancers, sold by our Columbus McKinnon’s Industrial Products (CMIP) division in Wuppertal, Germany, are used to relieve operators from the weight of hand tools. By using a tapered rope drum, the weight of the attached load is compensated so that loads up to 200 kg can be moved effortlessly along a vertical axis. Standard applications would include spot-welding guns, riveting machines or multiple-nut runners. One […]

Read the full article →

Understanding Crane Operator Hand Signals for Mobile, Overhead, Gantry and Tower Cranes

April 28, 2016






When working as a crane operator in a facility or at a jobsite, especially those with lots of traffic, it is crucial to understand and use crane operator hand signals. As required by OSHA 1926.1400 Cranes and Derricks, these individuals, or signal persons, must know all signals for mobile, tower and overhead cranes and must […]

Read the full article →

CMCO Distributor, REID Lifting, Proudly Sponsors the World’s Fastest Land Speed Record Attempt

April 14, 2016






The Bloodhound Supersonic Car (SSC) is set to become one of the world’s greatest engineering feats, capable of travelling at speeds over 1,000 mph. Started 8 years ago, the Bloodhound project is attempting to smash the current land speed record of 763 mph by Thrust SSC, the first land vehicle to break the sound barrier. When […]

Read the full article →